The Truth About Permanent Cosmetic Makeup Eyeliner, Lip Liner, and Eyebrow Tattoos

I’ve had cosmetic makeup procedures done in many parts of the world at many clinics and for many different reasons. All have been successful and I am delighted with the results; the ease of applying less makeup, waking up to beautiful brows and perfect eyeliner and softly colored lips. I also love going for a swim and coming out looking like I never got my face wet, at least there’s no runny eyebrow pencil, no black smudges of liner under my eyes and no dull. lifeless lips. That’s my experience, so naturally I’ve been recommending permanent makeup for a long time. But the truth is that tattooing any part of your face is a serious matter, and it’s definitely NOT for everyone!

My adventure with permanent makeup began in Asia, therefore I had some of the best cosmeticians attend me at a clinic in Hong Kong. Later in Taipei, I had my eyeliner retouched a few months before I was married, so my honeymoon on secluded beaches of Macau was free of makeup worries. However, throughout my travels as a cultural journalist, during almost 10 years in Asia, I also saw numerous ladies whose cosmetic tattoo eyebrows were a total disaster, mostly because the shape and the arch of the brow was overly pronounced, or because the tattoo had been done on an area above the natural brow, or so unnatural looking due to having the brow line tattooed in a solid inky stain on the skin and not a natural feathery application within some existing hair.

This seemed to have been the result of women getting eyebrow tattoos after having totally removed their natural brow hair, either through electrolysis or some other hair removal system. Most of these “not very flattering” eyebrow results were on women who lived in smaller villages and isolated regions where newer tattooing techniques had not yet began to be applied, and where black Chinese ink that was used to create dragons on the shoulders and backs of men was also used on lady’s brows. But the newest methods, which are used in international clinics, allow for a vast choice of pigments, including blending colors to get very natural shades that match even fair hair colors.

But who should get cosmetic tattoos and who shouldn’t? The truth is that if a lady has no brows due to an illness that has contributed to hair loss, a tattoo is an excellent solution, especially if the feathering techniques is used. What this means is that tiny strokes of pigment are applied to the brow region to look like hair, not a solid line. Women who have very sparse brow hair should also consider adding a bit of dimension with this same technique, and in this case, the technician will follow the natural brow. Women who should not consider these procedures are those who have poor natural healing abilities, who bleed profusely, who scar easily or have extremely sensitive skin.

If you’re unsure about getting eyebrows tattooed, since this procedure alters the look of the eye in a very noticeable way, then start with something smaller like a bit of eyeliner. Have your technician tattoo a fine outline in the lash line and see how your skin reacts to the pigment. If all is well, go ahead with the brows.
Source by Nena Argent

Use of Placenta in Cosmetics

Nowadays, the use placenta in cosmetic products is quite common.

Placenta is the inside layer of the womb which helps the fetus to obtain its food. It is an excellent ingredient for cosmetic products.

Placenta helps to stimulate human cell growth and renewal. Subsequently, it slows down human aging process.

In the past, extracts of placenta of sheep, pig and cow were used in cosmetic products. Although placenta extracts of animals like pig are biologically similar to human skin, controversies have been raised as to the use of these sources in cosmetic products, especially among the Muslim consumers as it is not halal. Placenta from the sheep namely ovine placenta however, is acceptable to the Muslim consumers.

There is another issue namely animal placenta may carry contagious diseases like bird flu, mad cow disease, SARS, AIDS etc. This is the main reason why the consumers avoid cosmetic products that contain animal placenta.

An alternative to animal placenta is phyto placenta which is actually the plant placenta. Phyto placenta was originally developed for scientific purposes. Because of its efficacy in skin treatment, it has been use in skin care products.

Potential active elements of placenta exist in buds and seeds of plant like the beech tree in Europe. They are plant embryos containing highly energetic active elements, hormones, flavonoids and peptides. These ingredients stimulate cell metabolism in plant leading to transformation from its dormant stage to full blooming.

In human being, these extracts have been clinically proven to stimulate cell growth leading to renewed youth and beauty.

Another source of phyto placenta is plant cell of soya. It provides plant estrogen which can supplement estrogen loss as the human becomes old. Loss of estrogen can cause the skin to lose its youthfulness and radiance.

Phyto placenta penetrates deep into human cell and forces them to grow at a faster pace, almost at the pace of the human adolescence years.

In conclusion, the use of placenta in cosmetic products has moved from animal placenta to phyto plancenta. Because cosmetic products using phyto placenta are free from contagious diseases, they are received overwhelmingly by consumers especially the Muslim consumers.
Source by Chai Yong

Types of Beauty Salons and Some Tips For Choosing the Right One For You

A lot of modern beauty salons today are equipped with state-of-the-art equipment for doing practically anything you wish to be done with your hair from getting a perm to hair coloring, hair extensions, hair straightening, hair re-bonding, hot oil, and so on. Beauty salons also offer a wide range of beauty services aside from hair styling such as manicure, pedicure, facials, massage, hair removal, tanning services, and even full-scale spa treatments.

Types of beauty salons

There are different types of beauty salons and one way to categorize them is by price range: low, middle, and upscale. There are walk-in facilities that do not require an appointment and are usually lower priced than the upscale beauty salons. These types are usually homegrown neighborhood salons and are ideal for the person on-the-go who wants a simple trim or a basic haircut or a wash-and-wear hairstyle. These salons may be a bit limited in their equipment and offer only basic services. The second type-mid-range category-is usually a franchise of a national salon chain. These salons are reputable and are known by trademark throughout the country. For those who want a change of hairstyle but wants to be on the safe side, this is a safe bet because stylists in these salon chains usually undergo strict training and have to pass certain standards before they are allowed to cut and style hair. These types of salons usually offer a wide range of services and are equipped with the latest beauty salon technologies. Upscale boutique salons may also be homegrown or owned by an international or national chain. Naturally, they are pricier and usually have a swanky or hip address. A lot of five-star hotels offer upscale beauty salons where the patrons are in the upper-class range. These salons usually have hairdressers in landau scrubs and provide full-pampering treatments. So if you have the money to spare, it is also god to indulge yourself in these salons once or twice a year.

Beauty salon tips

Sticking with one stylist and beauty salon is ideal for most because developing a relationship with your stylist makes it easier to get things done right; and when it comes to beauty, you want to avoid any errors as much as possible. Choose a stylist that you are comfortable with and one who has a natural instinct for knowing what looks good on you. Hunting for the perfect stylist will also be a matter of budget and proximity. Remember, however, when it comes to your hairstyle, think of it as an investment. Don’t scrimp too much when choosing a beauty salon since the right hairstyle can do a lot to make you look gorgeous and a bad one can do a whole lot to wreak havoc to your appearance. Also remember that the best salons are usually already discovered by a lot of people. Word gets around fast when a beauty salon or stylist is worth taking note of. This means that salons or stylists that are worth it are usually booked weeks in advance so don’t put off getting an appointment until the last minute.
Source by Brent McNutt

Makeup – Top 10 Ingredients To Avoid

1. Methyl, Propyl, Butyl and Ethyl Parabens.

Why used? A preservative. It’s cheap.

Where used? Shampoos, makeup, moisturizers, toothpaste and food.

Dangers: A report in the New Scientist 2004 stated that in an analysis of 20 breast tumors that “high concentrations of para-hydroxybenzoic acids (parabens) [were found] in 18 samples. Parabens can mimic the hormone estrogen, which is known to play a role in the development of breast cancers. The preservatives are used in many cosmetics and some foods to increase their shelf-life.” The jury is still out on whether parabens are to blame. But even the American Cancer Society says that more research has to be done to establish if parabens have an effect on breast cancer risk.

What to look for on labels: Anything ending with the word paraben.

2. Diethanolamine (DEA).

Why used? A wetting agent and provides a rich lather.

Where used? Shampoos, lotions, creams and other cosmetics.

Dangers: This isn’t harmful in itself but it can react with other ingredients in the cosmetic formula to form a potent carcinogen called nitrosodiethanolamine which is absorbed through the skin and has been linked with stomach, oesophagus, liver and bladder cancers.

What to look for on labels: DEA, diethanolamine, or DEA-related ingredients, including: Cocamide DEA, Cocamide MEA, DEA-Cetyl Phosphate, DEA Oleth-3 Phosphate, Lauramide DEA, Linoleamide MEA, Myristamide DEA, Oleamide DEA, Stearamide MEA, Triethanolamine (TEA), TEA-Lauryl Sulfate.

3. Diazolidinyl Urea.

Why used? It’s a preservative.

Where used? Many cosmetic, skincare products and shampoos, conditioners, bubble baths, baby wipes and household detergents.

Dangers: Established as a primary cause of contact dermatitis (American Academy of Dermatology). Contains formaldehyde, a carcinogenic chemical, is toxic by inhalation, a strong irritant, and causes contact dermatitis.

4. Sodium Lauryl/Laureth Sulfate. (SLS and SLES)

Why used? A foaming agent. It’s cheap.

Where used? Car washes, garage floor cleaners, engine degreasers, soaps, shampoos, detergents and toothpastes. Used in 90% of products that produce foam.

Dangers: Skin and eye irritant. SLES is somewhat less irritating than Sodium Lauryl Sulfate, it cannot be metabolised by the liver and its effects are therefore much longer-lasting. In the same way as it dissolves the grease on car engines, sodium lauryl sulfate also dissolves the oils on your skin, which can cause a drying effect. It is also well documented that it denatures skin proteins, which causes not only irritation, but also allows environmental contaminants easier access to the lower, sensitive layers of the skin.

Perhaps most worryingly, SLS is also absorbed into the body from skin application. Once it has been absorbed, one of the main effects of sodium lauryl sulfate is to mimic the activity of the hormone Oestrogen. This has many health implications and may be responsible for a variety of health problems from PMS and Menopausal symptoms to dropping male fertility and increasing female cancers such as breast cancer, where oestrogen levels are known to be involved.

5. Mineral oil

Why used? To hydrate skin. Because it is a left-over from the oil industry it’s very cheap. (In fact it’s cheaper to buy it than to dispose of it)

Where used? Many baby product including baby oil (100% mineral oil), petroleum jelly, baby wash liquid soap, baby lotions.

Dangers: Coats the skin like plastic, clogging the pores. Interferes with skin’s ability to eliminate toxins, promoting acne and other disorders. Slows down skin function and cell development, resulting in premature aging. What happens is that mineral oils cause the skin to actually dry out. Then you put on more mineral oil based products, which drys the skin even more and so a vicious cycle starts.

6. Talc.

Why used? Resistant to moisture

Where used? Soaps, deodorant and baby powders.

Dangers: Scientific studies have shown that talc is similar in structure to asbestos, a well known cancer causing agent. Studies also show that women who used talc in their genital area had a higher risk of developing ovarian cancer. This is particularly disturbing since this cancer has such a poor prognosis when diagnosed at an advanced stage. Talc poses a health risk when exposed to the lungs. Talc miners have shown higher rates of lung cancer and other respiratory illnesses from exposure to industrial grade talc, which contains dangerous silica and asbestos. Since the early 1980s, records show that several thousand infants each year have died or become seriously ill following accidental inhalation of baby powder.

7. Triethanolamine (TEA).

Why used? Adjusts PH levels, and are often the base for cleansers

Where used? Cleansing milks, eye gels, shampoos, shaving foams etc.

Dangers: Problems associated with TEA include allergic reactions and dryness of skin and hair. They can also be toxic to persons exposed over long periods of time.

8. Propylene Glycol.

Why used? Prevents the escape of moisture, makes the skin smoother. It’s cheap to produce.

Where used? Makeup, shampoos, deodorant, mascaras, skin cream, after shave, baby wipes, wallpaper stripper, paint and de-icer.

Dangers: Has many side effects including the risk of cancer, reproductive toxicity, usage restrictions, allergies and immune system toxicity, skin and eye irritations, organ system toxicity, endocrine disruption, contact dermatitis and neurotoxicity. It also is a penetration enhancer, meaning it penetrates skin cells, getting right into the bloodstream, carrying other chemicals with it. Many of the natural companies sell “paraben-free” and “aluminum-free” deodorants, but they still contain propylene glycol because it’s a cheap ingredient.

9. Artificial colors.

Why used? Cheaper to produce than naturally occurring coloring agents

Where used? Most cosmetics

Dangers: Coal Tar by-products, sold on the cheap to manufacturers to mimic naturally occurring colors and scents. such as Blue 1 and Green 3, are carcinogenic. Impurities found in commercial batches of other cosmetic colors such as D&C Red 33, FD&C Yellow 5, and FD&C yellow 6 have been shown to cause cancer not only when ingested, but also when applied to the skin.

10. Artificial Fragrances.

Why used? Cheaper to produce than naturally occurring fragrances.

Where used? Most makeup, cosmetics and skincare products

Dangers: Can contain chemicals that aren’t listed on the ingredients. (Would you buy some food that had an ingredient listed as ‘other stuff’?) Artificial fragrances can be a combination of unknown chemicals, sometime up to 200, and it is often difficult to determine what is in a product “fragrance” or if the ingredients used are safe. That’s because companies don’t have to tell consumers what is in a “fragrance.” This information is considered proprietary. Many synthetic fragrances contain phthalates which are toxic to the reproductive system and have been linked to health problems such as allergies, birth defects, cancer, and respiratory disorders.

The conclusion about these ingredients in makeup products: While it probably isn’t possible to remove all chemicals from all products it’s important for us to be well informed as to what we are buying and the implications. Certainly we all should be wanting to reduce the amount of chemical that our bodies absorb through the skin. From the other extreme, its not wise to get stressed out if you can’t find something 100% natural. This would offset the benefits of using natural makeup.

This is where natural makeup and cosmetic products come in – we can protect our skin and bodies.

Did you also notice that the reason for many of these ingredients being used is because they are cheap. So it begs the question – if companies are putting so much cheap ingredients in their makeup, just why then are their cosmetic, makeup and skincare products so expensive? Yes, we are paying for advertising, packaging and then name.

What are the alternatives? At my site http://purenaturalmakeup.com you will be able to find some great alternatives to these nasty ingredients. You will also find some great tips and recipes for natural makeup and skin care

You will probably agree that it’s time to change to natural products. Don’t let your looks kill you!
Source by Arina Gibson

Cosmetic History – Milestones of the Last Century

The discovery of the art of photography and of films, particularly, provided the impetus to a sudden growth in cosmetics. As watchers saw images of famous people with perfect complexity and strong sexual appeal, the standards of a woman’s beauty started to change. Cosmetics have become a means to beautify one’s physical appearance.

During the 1920s, cosmetic history increased quickly. Between the year 1927 and 1930, advertising expenses on the radio increased from $ 300,000 to $ 3.2 million. At first, a lot of female magazines magazines advertised advertisements on cosmetics. However, near the end of the 1920s, cosmetics had progressed and cosmetic advertising in magazines became one of the magazine industries’ largest revenue producing resources.

Here is a brief chronological overview of cosmetics from 1900 to 2010:

1900: Annie Turnbo, a black entrepreneur, starts selling hair conditioners, hair treatments as well as harmless hair straightening products, and hair growers door-to-door.

1904: From Lodz, Poland, Max Factors moves to the United States, and 4 years later to the state of Los Angeles, where he puts make-ups up for sale to movie celebrities that does not crack or cake.

1909: Eugene Schueller, a French chemist, creates the very first harmless commercial hair dye. In the year 1910, his company was named L’Oreal.

1905: Sarah McWilliams starts to sell hair growers from door to door. After being wed to Charles J. Walker, she became recognized as Madame CJ Walker and integrated her business in Indianapolis in the year 1911.

1909: Cosmetologist Elizabeth Hubbard and Florence Graham open a shop on 5th Avenue in New York City. After some time, Florence Graham renames their shop Elizabeth Arden.

1914: Maybelline has been discovered by TJ Williams. The cosmetics company of Maybelline specializes in mascaras.

1922: The bobby pin has been invented in order to control or deal with short or bobbed hair.

1932: Charles Lackman, a supplier for nail polish, and Joseph and Charles Revson, distributors for nail polish, discovered Revlon. Revlon is a cosmetics business that sells nail polish in a broad range of colors.

1932: A New York chemist named Lawrence Gelb brings home a hair dye product that goes through the hair shaft. He also starts a business named Clairol. In the year 1950, he commences Miss Clairol Hair Color Bath, a one step hair coloring product.

1933: A fresh, new technique for enduring waves, making use of chemicals, which does not need machinery or electricity, is introduced.

1935: Pancake make up, initially developed in order to appear natural on dye film, was made by the famous Max Factor

1941: Aerosols are actually untested, paving the way for the hairspray.

1944: Benjamin Green, a pharmacist of Miami Beach, develops the sunscreen in order to shield soldiers’ skins in the South Pacific.

1958: Mascara wands come out, doing away with the need to apply mascara using a brush.

1961: Cover Girl cosmetics, one of the 1st brand names put up in grocery stores for sale and aimed to teens is started by Noxema.

1963: For the first time in the cosmetic history, Revlon offers its very first powdered blush-on.

The next four decades of cosmetic history can be summed up as follows:

The 1970’s: a softer look became fashionable with painted eyeliners and eyelashes taking a downturn in sales. White highlighters and soft eye shadows were popular.

The 1980’s: anti-aging, skin care, and beauty treatments (therapy) were the fashion trends that evolved and there was an emphasis on tanning and the link to cancer.

The 1990’s: Touch © by Yves St. Laurent was launched and became the item to have as part of one’s cosmetic regimen.

2000 to 2010: History will make this the decision for certified organic and / or natural cosmetics. A period in which safe, toxic-free products will be launched by many companies around the world, but the US will be left behind.

Regulations will develop globally to certify cosmetic products as being organic and / or natural, but through strong lobbyists in Washington, DC, the US Cosmetic Industry will fight legislation to remove toxic ingredients in cosmetics, claiming their products are perfectly safe. Ultimately, when cosmetic history is studied sometimes in the future, it will show that the industry placed revenue and profits before the health benefits of consumers.

Certifying organizations, mostly in other countries, will emerge, and although they will each use different criteria, in the end, they will have provided the consumer with safe, toxic-free cosmetic products. The hope is that the $ 50 billion US Cosmetic Industry will be somehow encouraged to do the same.
Source by Al J. Spicoli